Autism is not a disease.  It is a life-long condition.  
— The Art of Autism

Many misconceptions exist about people with autism that limit understanding of those on the spectrum.  Some believe that people with autism don't want friends, or that they can't feel or express emotions.  Some believe that autism is caused by vaccination, or bad parenting.  None of these things are true!  Autism is an umbrella term for a group of complex disorders of brain development.   Individuals with autism may display communication difficulty, repetitive behaviors, sleep dysfunction, and unusual responses to sensory input, to name a few. While characteristics of autism may last an entire lifetime, early and intensive intervention can make a difference in a child's developmental outcome!  Autism affects more than 1 percent of the population (1 in 88 children), 40% of which have above-average intellectual abilities.  In fact, many of those on the autism spectrum have exceptional abilities in visual, music, and academic skills.  Check out The Art of Autsim to see some brilliant examples of art created by these exceptional individuals!

Ashley Chloe and View Through My Lens,  an Etsy shop by Laurie Piantigini LaBonte specializing in hair ties, party favors, invitations, and more, are collaborating for Autism Awareness Month (all of April) to spread awareness and increase understanding and acceptance of individuals with Autism.  

With every Helix Cuff purchase, receive a free set of "Different Not Less" Creaseless Hair Ties to show your support for those on the autism spectrum!

We are also donating 10% of our proceeds to the The Art of Autism, a nonprofit who works to display the creative abilities of individuals of people on the autism spectrum and others who are neurodivergent.  Check out some of the absolutely incredible artwork featured on their blog, and be sure to follow them on Facebook and Twitter!


Please spread the word by sharing this offer Below!

Further Reading
*https://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/sctk_about_autism.pdf